If you haven’t seen this viral video that turns the “Walk of Shame” into a “Stride of Pride,” take a few minutes to enjoy.

 

The video shows Amber Rose in a party dress, high-heels in hand, leaving a house and strolling through town. The people she passes assume she’s headed home after a one-night stand but instead of shaming her, they shout congratulations, acknowledging that sex is fun. The mayor even gives her the key to the city for her  confidence.

The video was released in September ahead of the Amber Rose Slutwalk which took place in LA on October 3. What a way to promote an event that protests and refutes societal expectations of women and sex!

The Amber Rose Slutwalk was hosted by Amber Rose’s own foundation which has a mission to promote discussion about women’s right and equality issues. Her explains the motive saying, “We join the movement on this cause against sexual injustice, victim blaming, derogatory labeling and gender inequality.” The LA Slutwalk was just one of many that have taken place around the world since spring 2011 when the first Slutwalk took place in Toronto.

Slutwalks began when a police officer told college women in Toronto not to dress like sluts in order to avoid sexual assault. In response, women took to the streets “dressed like sluts” to demonstrate that assaultants, not clothing, cause assault. The movement took off across North America and traveled around the world with Slutwalks taking place in Europe and Australia over the following years.

They haven’t fallen out of style yet. In fact, Amber Rose’s involvement helped to attract publicity and participants to the LA Slutwalk. In addition, her foundation worked to make the event more inclusive of non-white women who may not have felt included at previous Slutwalks.

Writing for RH Reality Check Janna Zinzi commented, “Famous people have greater access to resources and a broader audience than most organizers can reach. Slut-shaming, sexual assault prevention, and sex positivity deserve the attention that certain celebrities can bring, and feminism needs diverse role models, especially women of color, to bring the variety of issues to broader communities.”

The event was clearly very personal to Amber Rose who has spoken publicly about her own experience with slut-shaming. She recently told The Guardian, “I’ve been called a slut while I was still a virgin. I have been called a slut while I was in a committed relationship with my husband. So it really doesn’t matter what you do in life, people can call you that name because they are uncomfortable with your sexuality. That’s all it is.”

By creating a viral video that shows that women can enjoy sex and by using her celebrity to lead a Slutwalk in LA, Amber Rose is leading the march for women to own their own sexuality and reclaim the idea of a “slut” as anything but shameful.

What do you think about the video and the SlutWalk movement? Share your comments with us below or on the Casual Sex Project Facebook page or Twitter page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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